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Dit Da Jow

Dit Da Jow
by John Crescione
For as unique a martial art as Wing Chun, it's still a Kung Fu system like the rest.That means herbal medicine, point hitting and chi kung are included in its curriculum and system structure. However, depending on which Wing Chun Sifu you speak to (including your own), these subjects will bring about wonderful coffee-table philosophical discussions.

The purpose of this small article is to give the Wing Chun practitioner the ability to learn how to make an herbal preparation and learn something about Chinese medicine and Wing Chun. Oh, and by the way, I'm going to try and do it for you as quickly and cheaply as possible AND without pushing anyone's button's on the above subjects. Dit Da Jow (Cantonese) or Tieh Ta Chiao (Mandarin) means "Hit and Fall Wine" (or liniment). Jow, as it is commonly referred to, can be broken down into two types: Han Dit Da Jow (cold hit medicine) and Rei Dit Da Jow (hot hit medicine).

Hot Jow is actually heated for situations that require a lot of circulation, blood flow and lymphatic drainage into an area - such as with iron palm training where you are constantly challenging the skin, bone, muscles and connective tissues of the hand and arm to become tougher and stronger while at the same time attempting to keep the acupuncture points in the hand open so that you can project energy through the hand into the target (P8 and Heart8 - look them up in any acupuncture book if you're not familiar with these two points).

Cold Jow is used as an all-purpose, when in doubt and after the fact, injury liniment. Its properties are similar to hot
Jow except:
1. it's not heated,
2. the herbs used are different and,
3. to promote the breakup of stagnant blood, lymph and chi circulation (if you don't believe in chi circulation then ignore the last two words and replace them with "breaking connective tissue adhesions that interfere with normal tissue healing and the electrical charge flow of the body.")

Both types are rubbed into the skin before and after a workout for best results . It should be noted that one of the secrets of the magical Jow formula is in the rubbing. Remember way back as a kid, when you got a cold and Mom or Grandma would come in and rub you down with alcohol or Vicks, the secret was in the rub. Soft tissue manipulation alone will promote many of the qualities without the Jow, though the medicine speeds up the healing time and prevents improper drainage and stagnation problems. While we are on the subject of rubbing, Tiger Balm is the oriental version of Ben Gay or Vicks. If you can't get a good Jow, or if you don't want to buy it store-bought because of the quality, or "it just has to be made fresh and official by Sifu", Tiger Balm is almost as good. If you want to make your own because you can't find it (hard to believe), here's how to do it. I'll get to the Jow recipe in a minute.

· Take a small jar of Vaseline, a small jar of Vicks, cayenne red pepper (it's somewhere in the kitchen on your spice rack) and either dried red chilli peppers (most gourmet stores have them) or red chilli peppers that have already been bottled (they're probably next to the cayenne pepper).

· Put the Vaseline in a pot and melt it on the stove at low heat.

· Add two or three tablespoons of Vicks - depending on how smelly and mentholly you want it - until that also is melted.

· Grind up the red pepper until it's a powder, mix it with the cayenne pepper and add to the melted Vaseline.

· While in its liquid state, repour it back into a jar and let cool.

I did not mention the quantities of either the cayenne pepper or the chilli pepper because that will be up to you based on the desired strength of your compound. If you use a small jar of Vaseline and you want it hot, use two tablespoons of both peppers finely ground and stirred into the compound. When it cools it will be somewhere between a pink to red color. You've just made Red Tiger Balm - congratulations!

Now back to the Jow - the recipe that I will give you is a simple one that uses common Chinese herbs that are for the most part easy to get in herb catalogs or herbal stores if you have a Chinatown or wholistic community near you.

(these are the botanical names and Chinese names) 1 oz.=30 grams
· 1 bottle of strong vodka, gin or Chinese rice wine
· Artemesia (Liu ji nu) - 5g
· Borneol (Bingpian) - 1g
· Carthamus (Honghua) - 5g
· Catechu (Ercha) - 8g
· Cinnabar (Zhusha) - 5g
· Cirsium (DaJi) - 1g
· Dragon's Blood (Xuejie) - 30g
· Mastic (Ruxiang) - 5g
· Musk (Shexiang) - 1g
· Myrrh (Moyao) - 5g
· Pinellia (ShengBanXia) - 5g

Take all ingredients and grind into a fine powder, add the whole bottle of vodka or gin. Mix well and rub into the injured area. The beauty of this particular recipe is that you don't have to bury it for 35 days to two month before you can use it. Classically when you made Jow it had to be buried underground for an extended period of time before it was ready to be used. There was no magical/mystical reasoning behind it. Sunlight and heat oxidize the herbs and change the chemical properties so, keeping in mind it's around the year 1700, where are you going to store this stuff when you need a dark cool dry place? And what do you use to ferment and age your herbal combination to get the most out of your ingredients - alcohol. That's why a 100 year old Scotch Whiskey is supposed to be so good. If you desire to have the herbs soak, pour the combination into a dark glass container and place it in a closet or cupboard where it shouldn't get too hot, and periodically shake the liniment once or twice a week. You should note that if you do this the traditional way then the herbs are loosely ground, and not into a powder. And the longer they sit in the bottle the stronger the Jow becomes. This is the reason many Kung Fu practitioner's who are traditionally or classically trained (like myself) will not buy store bought Jow, but prefer to make our own. The store bought Jow never has any of the herbs at the bottom of the bottle that they come in. Also some Jow is sold in plastic bottles, and over time the plastic starts to break down into the herbal formula. And some Jow is even sold in clear bottles with no way to know how long it's been in there. A decent Jow should look like soy sauce in color and have a slight alcohol, medicinal smell. Please note this Jow recipe may not be as dark or "smelly" due to the quality of herbs, time left to soak before usage, cooking properties of some of the herbs, combinations of the specific herbs or the specific usage properties. This is a "fast" formula, it's original intent is to be made now to use now, not in a month or two. The Wing Chun player usually needs Jow on their hands, forearms and chest. The first couple of times that you try to punch with the bottom three knuckles, blood vessels are usually broken between the last two knuckle valleys. Jow should be applied in between the knuckles before and after punching the bag, wall bag or focus mitt. A very important reason for this is because two very powerful acupuncture points reside in those two valleys and are responsible for the hormonal system and small intestines. With any type of bruise or blood stagnation, problems in circulation and health may occur. When doing any prolonged bridge (forearm) work such as Pak Sao where bruising can occur, Jow needs to be worked into the bridges. And anyone who is up to Chi Sao level knows why they have to apply Jow to the chest, especially if your partner is using you as the Wooden Man to practice new techniques, or just delights in pounding on you. But what becomes more important is that the famous Wing Chun centerline is in Chinese medicine the conception vessel meridian which basically is involved with the alarm point systems of the body. Cv-17 is dead center on the sternum and is responsible for controlling the diaphragm, controlling energy to the G.I.and G.U. systems and is a storage area for chi in the body. A pretty good place to hit! And we do this to each other repeatedly and on purpose.

It is important that Jow not be rubbed into open wounds, taken internally or gotten in the eyes. Jow recipes are common in every system and every instructor has a favorite or favorites based on their uses. I have personally spoken to Yip Chun, Yip Ching, William Cheung, Augustine Fong and Moy Yat, all of whom have their own Jow recipes (that were given to them personally by Yip Man and is the true historical Jow handed down from Leung Jan). Now, if you have a true Wing Chun mentality then you really don't care if it is the true Leung Jan Jow - only whether it works.

Two last points. First, if you do Chi Kung, or your system of Wing Chun has it in it (that's another article) try this: rub the Jow or balm into some of your injuries, then do your Chi Kung, concentrating on directing the Jow into the skin and into the injuries. In about two weeks of this you should be pleasantly surprised. If it's an old chronic injury the rubbing technique is usually slow and deep, if it's relatively new then it's a light, quick type of rubbing.

Secondly, learn as much as you can about herbs, both American and Chinese. Do you know why the Chinese used Ginseng, Ma Huang and Tang Kuei? BECAUSE THEY WERE IN CHINA!! Those herbs were indigenous to that country. If Kung Fu was invented in this country our "traditional" Jow would contain completely different ingredients! So if you like to think of yourself as a "true" martial artist, start learning about American herbs and their qualities to heal externally and internally. If there is interest, I will write another article on how to make a homegrown / Americanized Jow.

I have tried to make a complex and complicated subject as easy as possible, and given you a little idea about how to make a simple Jow and balm. If you have any questions or comments you can reach me at my e-mail address. This is only one simple starting recipe out of hundreds. I didn't address the cooking, non-cooking, Yin vs. Yang qualities, when to change Jows, liniment vs.oil base Jows, etc., etc. This is Wing Chun - it should be as simple as a straight punch.

Camphor 10g
Raw Fruit of Cape Jasmine 5g
Raw Root of Kusenoff Monkshood 25g
Raw Aconite Root 25g
Raw Tuber Of Jackinthepulpit 25g
Raw Pinellia Tuber 25g
Cattail Pollen 25g
Raw Chinese Quince 200g
Raw Rhubarb 150g
Root-Bark of slenderstyle acanthopanax 100g
Rhizome of incised notopterygium 200g
Root of double teeth pubescent angelica 200g
Root of Red Peony 150g
Place in a jar with white wine (Gao Liang Wine or any other high alcohol content wine) for 7-15 days. Can be used for all injuries that don't break the skin.

Dit Da Jow recipe:
Secretio Moschus moschiferi she-hsiang 1.5g
Semen Strychnotis ma-chien tzu 120g fry in oil, remove hairs
Flos Carthami tinctorii hung-hua 150g
Semen Persicae tao-jen 120g
Myrrha mo -yao 120g vinegar processed
Gummi Olibanum (Frankinsense) ju-hsiang 120g vinegar processed
Eupolyphagae che-chung 60g
Herba Ephedra ma-huang 90g
Semen Sinapis albae pai-chieh-tzu 60g
Radix Angelica (dong kwei) dong kwei 90g
Radix et rhizoma Ligusticii kao-pen 90g
Pyritum dipped in vinegar tzu-jan-tung 90g dipped in vinegar 7x
Radix Glycryrrhizae kan-tsao 60g (licorice not ginger)

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Dit Da Jao recipe (American Herbs?)

Arnica blossoms (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
Comfrey (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
Blessed Thistle (blood purifier)
Goldenseal root (antibiotic, wound healing)
Ginger root (circulation, wound healing, pain relief)
Myrrh (antiseptic, circulation, wound healing)
Sasparilla root (blood purifier)
Witch Hazel (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)

Use equal proportions of all the herbs (OK, myrrh is a resin) listed, by weight. I measure them out on a small kitchen scale (mine is calibrated in grams, but American versions no doubt do ounces).

Grind the herbs in a mortar & pestle (or electric grinder) and place them in a glass jar. Add 80 or 90 proof grain alcohol (I use vodka); use 4 ounces of dried herbs to one pint of alcohol base (or equivalent proportions). Seal the jar tightly. Allow the infusion to work for two weeks; once or twice a day, swirl the liquid gently through the herbal mash. After two weeks, strain off the liquid and discard the herbal residue; pour into smaller glass containers.

This tincture can be applied as is to swollen or bruised areas, or can be mixed with a thickener (like lanolin or safflower oil) and a hardener (like beeswax) to make an ointment. This formulation has also been effective in the treatment of arthritis, for pain relief and restoration of range of motion.

Dit Da Jao('iron wine')
Types of Herbs

There are three types of herbs in the preparation:

1. herbs that reduce pain
2. herbs that stimulate blood and chi flow
3. herbs that break up blood clots and bruises

You should include equal amounts of each type of herbs in the wine:
Prescription

The amount of each herb used may vary anywhere from 3/5 oz. to 2 oz. per gallon (Try 1 oz. of each herb per gallon).

1. Measure off equal amounts of each herb and place in separate containers.
2. Grind each herb into a coarse powder (fine powder will adhere to itself and clot, preventing thorough absorption).
3. Place the herbs into a large non-metallic pot.
4. Add 1 qt. of vodka.
5. Simmer slowly over a low flame for 3.5 hours
6. Remove from heat.
7. Pour into a two gallon jar.
8. Add six more quarts of vodka.
9. Seal the jar so it is air-tight.
10. Store in a cool, dry, dark place.
11. Age from 2 months to 1 year.

NOTE: The longer the wine ages, the stronger it becomes.
Ingredients

There are two classes of wine: Toxic and Non-Toxic. The non-toxic variety will produce a very potent wine suitable for healing open cuts and wounds. The toxic variety of herbs may be added to the non-toxic herbs to produce an even more potent wine which must be kept away from cuts, and away from the mouth.
Non-Toxic Herbs
Group I

1. Aucklandia Root (Guang Mu Hsiang)
2. Frankincense (Ru Hsiang)
3. Myrrh (Mei Yao or Mo Yao)

Group II

1. Chinese Angelica Root (Dang Gwei)
2. Cat-Tail Pollen (Pa Huang)
3. Safflower (Hung Hua)

Group III

1. Root Pseudo-Ginseng (T'ien Ch'i)
2. Red Peony Root (Ch'ih Shou)
3. Dragon's Blood (Shweh Jin)

Toxic Herbs
Group I

1. Borneo Camphor Tree (Lung Nao Xiang Bing Pian)

Group II

1. Clove Tree (Ding Xiang)
2. Peach Kernel (Prunus Persica)d
(this herb is also in Group III - Toxic)

Group III

1. Rhubarb (Da Huang)
(this herb is also in Group I - Toxic)

One More Addition....

Horse Money or Horse Coin (Ma Ch'ien)
(EXTREMELY POISONOUS! But it greatly increases the strength of all the other herbs in the mixture.)
Dit Da Jow recipe:
Ingredients:
Arnica blossoms (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
Comfrey (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
Blessed Thistle (blood purifier)
Goldenseal root (antibiotic, wound healing)
Ginger root (circulation, wound healing, pain relief)
Myrrh (antiseptic, circulation, wound healing)
Sasparilla root(blood purifier)
Witch hazel (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)

Use equal portions of all infredients, by weight. Grind the herbs in a mortar and pestle (or electric grinder), and place in a glass jar. Add 80 or 90 proof grain alcohol. Use 4 oz. of dried herbs to one pint of alcohol base( or equivalent portions). Seal the jar tightly. Allow the infusion to work for two weeks; once or twice a day, swirl the liquid gently through the herbal mash. After two weeks, strain off the liquid and discard the herbal residue; pour into smaller glass containers.

This tincture can be applier as is to swollen and bruised areas, or can be mixed with a thickener (like lanolin or safflower oil), and a hardener (like beeswax) to make an ointment. This formula has been effective in the treatment of arthritis, for pain relief, and restoration of range of motion.

This appears to be a formula that uses equivalent western herbs, rather than oriental herbs, It is also the first jow I've come across with analgesic and anti-biotic properties.

Dit Da Jow recipe:
Camphor 10g
Raw Fruit of Cape Jasmine 5g
Raw Root of Kusenoff Monkshood 25g
Raw Aconite Root 25g
Raw Tuber Of Jackinthepulpit 25g
Raw Pinellia Tuber 25g
Cattail Pollen 25g
Raw Chinese Quince 200g
Raw Rhubarb 150g
Root-Bark of slenderstyle acanthopanax 100g
Rhizome of incised notopterygium 200g
Root of double teeth pubescent angelica 200g
Root of Red Peony 150g

Place in a jar with white wine (Gao Liang Wine or any other high alcohol content wine) for 7-15 days. Can be used for all injuries that don't break the skin.

Dit Da Jow recipe: Secretio Moschus moschiferi she-hsiang 1.5g
Semen Strychnotis ma-chien tzu 120g fry in oil, remove hairs
Flos Carthami tinctorii hung-hua 150g
Semen Persicae tao-jen 120g
Myrrha mo-yao 120g vinegar processed
Gummi Olibanum (Frankinsense) ju-hsiang 120g vinegar processed
Eupolyphagae che-chung 60g
Herba Ephedra ma-huang 90g
Semen Sinapis albae pai-chieh-tzu 60g
Radix Angelica (dong kwei) dong kwei 90g
Radix et rhizoma Ligusticii kao-pen 90g
Pyritum dipped in vinegar tzu-jan-tung 90g dipped in vinegar 7x
Radix Glycryrrhizae kan-tsao 60g (licorice not ginger)

> 1- Any idea about where can a person buy those products. I doubt that they > are sold in a supermarket.

Any Chinese Herbal medicine shop, usually in a Chinatown of your city.

> 2.- Supposing that I found all of them, then what? I just mix them, boil > them, or what?

Grind the musk into fine powder before grinding the rest of the herbs which should also be sieved. Mix these with the musk and shape into pills with 1030g honey. Each pill should weigh about 4.5g. Wrap in waxed paper before packing them in a box for use.

1 pill twice a day, chase with rice wine. Prohibited to pregnant woman.

Regards

Jason

Hello Aikido List,

Janet asked:

> Arnica montana. according to Encyclopedia Brit., is a perennial herb of > north and central European highlands. The essential oil contains > whatever the active ingrediant is. Anyone out there know the source for > dit da > jyou?

There are many dit da jiews, depending upon the purpose of use, and what area the recipe is originally from.

There are dit da jiews that can be used to repair injury after training, and there are those that can be applied before training to prevent injury.

Chinese doctors rarely give out the recipes for their ddj's, as they generally are family secrets that are generations old, but there are a few recipes available in Western literature. Dr. Yang, Jwing Ming provides some very efficacious ddj's in the appendix to his book "Analysis of Shaolin Chin Na", and the recipe I have included here comes from the "Secret Shaolin Formulae For The Treatment Of External Injury" and is used to treat "injury of tendon and bones caused by Chin Na Luo" which is a type of injury caused by overstreching the tendons:

Secretio Moschus moschiferi musk secretions
Semen Strychnotis seed of strychnos nux-vomica
Flos Carthami tincorii tincture of Carthami flower
Semen Persicae peach kernal
Myrrha resin of Commiphora
Gummi Olibanum (Frankinsense) resin of Boswellia
Eupolyphagae bug from Blattidae family
Herba Ephedra stems of Ephdra sinica
Semen Sinapis albae mustard seed
Radix Angelica (dong kwei) root of Angelia Sinensis
Radix Ligustici wallachii root of Cnidium
Pyritum dipped in vinegar Iron Pyrites
Radix Glycryrrhizae fresh ginger

I might add that there are much more than just "sulphides" present in these herbs. There are essential oils, resins, alkaloids, flavinoids, fatty acids, fatty oils, glucosides, vitamins, proteins and salts that all have varying actions on different systems of the human body.

The interesting thing about Chinese herbs, and something that has been proven in laboratory tests, is that the overall effect of a recipe is greater than the sum effects of it's individual ingredients. That means when you mix herbs, you get more of an effect than the two herbs would give if used separately. This is known as synergism in Chinese medicine.

Musk, to choose just one ingredient in this recipe, for example has at least 26 identified chemical constituents and has clinically been shown to exhibit:

1) Central nervous system-stimulating effect
2) Hypotensive effect (increases respiration and lowers blood pressure)
3) Male hormone-like effects
4) Uterus stimulating effects, such as contractions
5) Remarkable anti-inflammatory effect
6) Strong anti-bacterial effect on Staphylococcus and E.coli
There is a lot more happening here than just sulphides oxidising broken blood vessels...

Repair of injured tissue operates on numerous levels of the human physiological system.

Just a thought,

Jason

Sydney Australia

Hi George,

you asked:

>Myrrha mo-yao 120g vinegar processed >Gummi Olibanum (Frankinsense) ju-hsiang 120g vinegar processed >Pyritum dipped in vinegar tzu-jan-tung 90g dipped in vinegar 7x > Thank you Jason. Just one question. What you mean with "vinegar > processed"?

"VINEGAR PROCESSED"

Use 20 parts Olibanum to 1 part vinegar. Crush the Olibanum then fry, while sprinkling with the vinegar. Dry then recrush for use.

Same process for Myrrha

Pyritum; dip in vinegar, allow to sit in open air. A green "rust" will form. Do this seven times, thereby dissloving a certain amount of copper so that it can enter the solution.

> And also, Peach seed (tao jen) , is it not toxic ?

1. Fatty oils: 40%-50%
2. Oleic acid
3. Palmitic acid
4. Stearic acid

In large doses the oleic acid is toxic. In very large doses can cause death. In controlled doses, and in conjunction with these other constituents exhibits:

1. Anticoagulant effect
2. Hypotensive effect
3. Antiphlogistic and analgesic effect
4. Effective against tuberculosis
5. Also detoxificant and laxative.

Please note that "tao-jen" as purchased in a Chinese herbal shop is "DRIED peach kernal". The prussic acid has been neutralised in the drying process.

Regarding ma-huang, yes it contains some powerful compounds;

1. Alkaloids 0.3-1.5% ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, norephedrine, norpseudoephedrine N-methyl-ephedrine, N-methylpseudoephedrine ephedrines A, B, C

2. Essential oils: 1-a-terpinol, noracosan-10-ol, tricosan-1-ol nonacosan

As Cady observed:

>That contains a powerful chemical compound that should be used sparingly >and with caution, as medical authorities are now noting.

Sparingly and with caution is good advice. Following the advice of an experienced Chinese herbal medical specialist is better advice. The problem with a little knowledge is that yes, it can be dangerous thing.

Western people started hearing about the efficacy of ma-huang, as well as other herbs (Cordyceps; tung-chung-hsia, and Aconite; fo-ti-tieng or fu-tzu) and when they felt the benefits of their action, mistakenly thought "more is better" and subsequently overdosed, causing frightening problems, sometimes death. Now the substances are regarded as toxic, and some are banned in Australia.

In some instances, I do not understand why we westerners have to question, understand, argue and change certain knowledge from the east. What is wrong with accepting ancient knowledge?

This is the same with learning Aikido. Why do we have to question, understand, argue and change what we are learning from our Sensei? As a beginner, who are we to question the validity of ancient concepts and techniques until we have accepted them, trained in them, and had their developmental effect influence our body and mind?

Some years ago there was an argument about westerners not being able to master Japanese arts because they were not Japanese, and this caused outrage because we are all human beings. But nowadays I surpise myself by thinking that this statement has some truth, because for us to learn certain things, we need to be in a certain state of mind, and like it or not, there is a difference in the learning mind of eastern and western people...

I hope this is helpful for you to make dit da jiew yourself.

I have made several and can attest to their effectiveness. It must be stressed that the correct ddj should used for the proper condition. It must also be stressed that the method of preparation for recipes (no matter how ridiculous the method may appear) be followed as closely as possible. For example "dipping in vinegar" it sounds strange, but when you hear the reason, it becomes clear.

Good luck.

Jason

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Wednesday, March 08, 2006
Dit Da Jow Formulas
The following recipes are for external use only. I make absolutely no claims to their usage. Some of my students swear by them, and others have had mixed results. If your body breaks out in a rash immediately flush with water and do not reapply.


Recipe #1---For Bruising and Arthritis

Ingredients –

Alcohol (Vodka, Brandy, Rice Wine, even Rubbing Alcohol) 1 pint per 4 ozs. of herbs

Equal portions of each:

Arnica Blossoms - (anti inflammatory)
Comfrey - (anti inflammatory) * hard to find
Blessed Thistle - (blood purifier)
Goldenseal Root - (antibiotic)
Ginger Root – (circulation/wound healing)
Myrrh - (antiseptic/wound healing) *Myrrh is a resin
Sarsaparilla Root - (blood purifier)
Which Hazel - (anti inflammatory)

Grind all herbs and mix together. Add alcohol and let sit for at least two weeks, shaking mixture every few days. Note use a glass container. After a month strain out herbs.


Recipe #2 ----All Purpose

Ingredients -

I bottle of strong rice wine
Artemesia -- 5 grams
Borneol -- 1 gram
Carthamus -- 5 grams
Catechu -- 8 grams
Cinnabar -- 5 grams
Cirsium -- 1 gram
Dragon’s Blood -- 30 grams
Mastic -- 5 grams
Musk -- 1 gram
Myrrh -- 5 grams
Pinella -- 5 grams

Take all herbs and grind them into a fine powder. Mix together and store in dark place. Do not use plastic container. Shake mix every other day. This recipe can be used right away, but gets better with age.


Recipe #3----Iron Palm Formula

Alcohol – 1 to 2 quarts

1 oz of each of the following ---

Breadstraw
Calendula (Marigold)
Camomile
Comfrey
Common Club Moss
Cowslip
Danelion
Shepherd’s Purse
Sting Nettle
St. John’s Wort
Wintergreen Oil
Horsetail
Mallow
Cow Parsnip
Fenugreek
Walnut
Yellow Dead Nettle

Grind into powder and mix all ingredients, Store in dark place, shaking mix once or twice a week. Wait at least a month to use, but the older it gets the better it works.


Recipe #4 ---Joint Pain

WARNING !!!!! Extremely hot, don’t get anywhere near the eyes. Apply with CAN BLISTER THE SKIN ice cube to water formula down. Use a little until you see if you will break out in rash. .

One container of Vaseline (or related product)
One container of Vicks (any brand will do)
1 to 3 ounces of Capsicum (ground Chile or Cayenne pepper)

Melt Vaseline and vapor rub in pot. When melted add peppers. Mix well. Pour into container and let it cool off. DO NOT USE IN MELTED FORM.

Labels: Health

Posted by Gary Moro at 4:14 PM (permanent link)

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Oriental Medicine - Jow Recipes

 

Please remember, in supplying the following information, no claims are being made.
This is for educational purposes only and you should consult your Medical Doctor, or knowledgeable health care practitioner for further use or treatment of injuries.

There are two classes of jow, toxic and non-toxic. The non-toxic variety will produce a very potent jow suitable for healing open cuts and wounds. The toxic variety of herbs may be added to the non-toxic herbs to produce an even more potent jow, which must be kept away from cuts, and away from the mouth.

Non-Toxic Herbs

Group I
Aucklandia Root (Guang Mu Hsiang)
Frankincense (Ru Hsiang)
Myrrh (Mei Yao or Mo Yao)

Group II
Chinese Angelica Root (Dang Gwei)
Cat-Tail Pollen (Pa Huang)
Safflower (Hung Hua)

Group III
Root Pseudo-Ginseng (T'ien Ch'i)
Red Peony Root (Ch'ih Shou)
Dragon's Blood (Shweh Jin)

Toxic Herbs

Group I
Borneo Camphor Tree (Lung Nao Xiang Bing Pian)

Group II
Clove Tree (Ding Xiang)
Peach Kernel (Prunus Persica)d   (this herb is also in Group III - Toxic)

Group III
Rhubarb (Da Huang) (this herb is also in Group I - Toxic)
Horse Money or Horse Coin (Ma Ch'ien)  EXTREMELY POISONOUS! But it greatly increases the strength of all the other herbs in the mixture.)

As can be imagined, Chinese doctors rarely give out the recipes for their dit da jow's, as they are usually family secrets that are generations old. However, there are a few recipes available in Western literature.  Dr. Yang Jwing Ming provides some very effective dit da jow's in the appendix to his book "Analysis of Shaolin Chin Na", and there are also some recipes in "Secret Shaolin Formulae For The Treatment Of External Injury".

The following then are an assortment of jow and liniment recipes gathered from various sources. Please see the credits at the bottom of this page for the original sources.

Once again, please remember that no claims are being made about these recipes, and consultation with your medical practitioner is recommended for treatment of any injury.

Finally, the recipes……
[top of page]

All Purpose Jow
Iron Palm Jow
Recipe 1
Recipe 2
Recipe 3
Recipe 4 (Zheng Gu Shui )
Recipe 5
Tiger Balm

These two recipes are simple to make, the herbs should be available in most good health food stores or grocery store and they can be used immediately ie: they don’t have to be aged for weeks or months.

All Purpose Jow

  • Alcohol (Vodka, Gin, Brandy - even Rubbing Alcohol) 1 or 2 quarts
  • Breadstraw
  • Calendula (Marigold)
  • Camomile
  • Comfrey (if you can still get it - you may have to grow your own if you want to add this)
  • Common Club Moss
  • Cow slip
  • Dandelion
  • Shepherd's Purse
  • Stinging Nettle
  • St. John's Wort
  • Wintergreen oil (Many times this comes together with rubbing alcohol, either way is fine - obviously if you're going to use rubbing alcohol you won't need the vodka, gin, etc. Remember, boxers and other athletes have been using it for hundreds of years and they get abused a lot more on a daily basis than most of us.)

Use 1 oz. of each herb, pour the alcohol into a glass jar (or back into the alcohol bottle - all the herbs should have been ground or are small enough to funnel in). Leave it in a dark place for a week, shaking occasionally and you're ready to roll ( no pun intended ). True, the longer it keeps the better it will be, but you can use it in about an hour or two if necessary.

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Iron Palm Jow

Start with the above All Purpose formula and ADD THE FOLLOWING:

  • Horestail [horsetail?]
  • Mallow
  • Cow parsnip
  • Fenugreek
  • Walnut
  • Yellow dead Nettle

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Dit Da Jow recipe 1

  • Arnica blossoms (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
  • Comfrey (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)
  • Blessed Thistle (blood purifier)
  • Goldenseal root (antibiotic, wound healing)
  • Ginger root (circulation, wound healing, pain relief)
  • Myrrh (antiseptic, circulation, wound healing)
  • Sasparilla root (blood purifier)
  • Witch Hazel (anti-inflamatory, pain relief)

Use equal proportions of all the herbs (OK, myrrh is a resin) listed, by weight.
Grind the herbs in a mortar & pestle (or electric grinder) and place them in a glass jar.
Add 80 or 90 proof alcohol ( vodka, sake, whatever  ) Use 4 ounces of dried herbs to one pint of alcohol base (or equivalent proportions).
Seal the jar tightly. Allow the infusion to work for two weeks; once or twice a day, swirl the liquid gently through the herbal mash.
After two weeks, strain off the liquid and discard the herbal residue; pour into smaller glass containers.
This tincture can be applied as is to swollen or bruised areas, or can be mixed with a thickener (like lanolin or safflower oil) and a hardener (like beeswax) to make an ointment. This formulation has also been effective in the treatment of arthritis, for pain relief and restoration of range of motion.
This appears to be a formula that uses equivalent western herbs, rather than oriental herbs, and possesses both analgesic and anti-biotic properties.

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Dit Da Jow recipe 2

Ingredient

Quantity

Camphor

10g

Raw Fruit of Cape Jasmine

5g

Raw Root of Kusenoff Monkshood

25g

Raw Aconite Root

25g

Raw Tuber Of Jackinthepulpit

25g

Raw Pinellia Tuber

25g

Cattail Pollen

25g

Raw Chinese Quince

200g

Raw Rhubarb

150g

Root-Bark of slenderstyle acanthopanax

100g

Rhizome of incised notopterygium

200g

Root of double teeth pubescent angelica

200g

Root of Red Peony

150g

Place in a jar with white wine (Gao Liang Wine or any other high alcohol content wine) for 7-15 days. Can be used for all injuries that don't break the skin.

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Dit Da Jow recipe 3

This recipe comes from the "Secret Shaolin Formulae For The Treatment Of External Injury" and is used to treat "injury of tendon and bones caused by “Chin Na Luo" which is a type of injury caused by overstreching the tendons.

Botanical Name

Chinese Name

English Name

Quantity

Comment

Secretio Moschus moschiferi

she-hsiang

musk secretions

1.5g

 

Semen Strychnotis

ma-chien tzu

seed of strychnos nux-vomica

120g

fry in oil, remove hairs

Flos Carthami tinctorii

hung-hua

tincture of Carthami flower

150g

 

Semen Persicae

tao-jen

peach kernel

120g

 

Myrrha

mo-yao

resin of Commiphora

120g

vinegar processed

Gummi Olibanum

ju-hsiang  

Frankinsense or resin of Boswellia

120g

vinegar processed

Eupolyphagae

che-chung

Eupolyphagae bug from Blattidae family

60g

 

Herba Ephedra

ma-huang

stems of Ephdra sinica

90g

 

Semen Sinapis albae

pai-chieh-tzu

mustard seed

60g

 

Radix Angelica

dong kwei

root of Angelia Sinensis

90g

 

Radix Ligustici wallachii

kao-pen

root of Cnidium

90g

 

Pyritum dipped in vinegar

tzu-jan-tung

 

90g

dipped in vinegar 7x

Radix Glycryrrhizae

kan-tsao

 

60g

fresh ginger

Grind the musk into fine powder before grinding the rest of the herbs, which should also be sieved.
Mix these with the musk and shape into pills with 1030g honey.
Each pill should weigh about 4.5g.
Wrap in waxed paper before packing them in a box for use.
1 pill twice a day, chase with rice wine.
Prohibited to pregnant woman.

These herbs contain "sulphides" essential oils, resins, alkaloids, flavinoids, fatty acids, fatty oils, glucosides, vitamins, proteins and salts that all have varying actions on different systems of the human body.

Musk for example has at least 26 identified chemical constituents and has clinically been shown to exhibit:

  • Central nervous system-stimulating effect
  • Hypotensive effect (increases respiration and lowers blood pressure)
  • Male hormone-like effects
  • Uterus stimulating effects, such as contractions
  • Remarkable anti-inflammatory effect
  • Strong anti-bacterial effect on Staphylococcus and E.coli

The interesting thing about Chinese herbs, and something that has been proven in laboratory tests, is that the overall effect of a recipe is greater than the sum effects of its individual ingredients. That means when you mix herbs, you get more of an effect than the herbs would give if used separately. This is known as synergism.

Vinegar Processed: Use 20 parts Olibanum to 1 part vinegar. Crush the Olibanum then fry, while sprinkling with the vinegar. Dry then recrush for use. Same process for Myrrha
 

Pyritum: dip in vinegar, allow to sit in open air. A green "rust" will form. Do this seven times, thereby dissloving a certain amount of copper so that it can enter the solution.

Peach Seed constituents:

  • Fatty oils: 40%-50%
  • Oleic acid
  • Palmitic acid
  • Stearic acid

In large doses the oleic acid is toxic and in very large doses can cause death. In controlled doses, and in conjunction with these other constituents it exhibits:

  • Anticoagulant effect
  • Hypotensive effect
  • Antiphlogistic and analgesic effect
  • Effective against tuberculosis
  • Also detoxificant and laxative.
  • Please note that "tao-jen" as purchased in a Chinese herbal shop is DRIED peach kernel. The prussic acid has been neutralized in the drying process.

Regarding ma-huang, yes it contains some powerful compounds:

  • Alkaloids 0.3-1.5% ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, norephedrine, norpseudoephedrine N-methyl-ephedrine, N-methylpseudoephedrine, ephedrines A, B,C Essential oils: 1-a-terpinol, noracosan-10-ol, tricosan-1-ol nonacosan
  • As such it should be treated with respect and used sparingly.

As an aside Western people started hearing about the efficacy of ma-huang, as well as other herbs (Cordyceps; tung-chung-hsia, and Aconite; fo-ti-tieng or fu-tzu) and when they felt the benefits of their action, mistakenly thought "more is better" and subsequently overdosed, causing frightening problems, sometimes death. Now the substances are regarded as toxic, and some are banned in some places.

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Dit da jow recipe 4: Zheng Gu Shui

Alleviates the pain from fractures, dislocated joints, tears of muscle, ligaments, cartilage and other soft tissue injuries. Also alleviates rheumatic pain, muscle aches and fatigue following physical exercise. Dissipates pain and discomfort following various sports injuries.

Traditional Chinese Rationale

Improves blood circulation, reduces swelling and relieves pain. It promotes regeneration of tissue at fracture site and repair of soft tissue injury. It stimulates the healing of bones, ligaments, tendons and muscle. This preparation is applied to the affected area and rubbed in gently.

Oriental name

Botanical Name

Bo He Nao

Herba Menthae

Zhang Nao

Camphora

San Qi

Radix Pseudoginseng

Bai Zhi

Radix Angelicae

Da Li Wang

Inula Cappa

Ji Gu Xiang

Radix Crotonis Crassifolis

Wu Ma Xun Cheng

Semen Tiglii

Qian Jin Ba

Radix Moghaniae Philippinensis

Qui Zhi

Cinnammomum

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Dit da jow recipe 5
1 oz.=30 grams

Botanical Name

Chinese Name

Quantity

1 bottle of strong vodka, gin or Chinese rice wine

   

Artemesia

Liu ji nu

5g

Borneol

Bingpian

1g

Carthamus

Honghua

5g

Catechu

Ercha

8g

Cinnabar

Zhusha

5g

Cirsium

DaJi

1g

Dragon’s Blood

Xuejie

30g

Mastic

Ruxiang

5g

Musk

Shexiang

1g

Myrrh

Moyao

5g

Pinellia

ShengBanXia

5g

Take all ingredients and grind into a fine powder
Add the whole bottle of vodka or gin
Mix well and rub into the injured area.
The beauty of this particular recipe is that you don’t have to bury it for two months before you can use it.
If you desire to have the herbs soak, pour the combination into a dark glass container and place it in a closet or cupboard where it shouldn’t get too hot, and periodically shake the liniment once or twice a week.

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Tiger Balm recipe

Ingredients % by weight amt. needed for 56oz. batch

Quantity

Menthol crystals 20 %

9.6 oz.

Camphor blocks 32 %

15.36 oz.

Bees wax 20 %

9.6 oz.

Petroleum jelly 4 %

1.92 oz.

Oil of clove 8 %

3.8 oz.

Oil of cajuput 8 %

3.8 oz.

Oil of cinnamon 8 %

3.8 oz.

Ammonium hydroxide ( optional)

1 oz.

Melt beeswax and petrolium jelly in a pot until completely liquified.
Remove from heat, quickly stir in camphor blocks (may help to chop or grate camphor prior).
Add rest of ingredients, stir until consistent, and camphor has melted.
Pour into permanant container, and let congeal.
The above recipe will make a nice tiger balm equivalent to the commercial white stuff. If ammonium hydroxide is added, it turns red, and adds a little more heat to it.

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Common herbs for Trauma and a Rx for Trauma Wine
by Robert Chu, L.Ac.

(Originally featured in California Journal of Oriental Medicine, Fall 2001)

What led me to a study of TCM was a lifelong practice of martial arts. In martial arts, aside from the artistic perfection of strikes, kicks, joint locking, throwing and ground fighting, the health giving benefits of opening up the channels and collaterals for qi flow, learning meditation to calm the mind, we specialize in trauma, both healing and inflicting. My sifu said, "it's easy learn how to injure someone, but is difficult to learn how to heal someone." How correct he was. A punch to Ren 17 can have devastating effects, a kick to UB 40 can bring an attacker to his knees in practice. As a consequence, in order to survive the training, many martial arts teachers specialize in die da shang ke - literally "fall and strike traumatology", which are overlapped by TCM's wai ke (External diseases) and gu shang ke (Orthopedics and Traumatology). I was fortunate to be able to study the rudiments of die da shang ke under my Wing Chun sifu, Kwan Jong Yuen and my Hung Ga sifu, Yee Chi Wai. Through the years I also met other famous martial artists and TCM doctors like Kenny Gong, Lui Yon Sang, Chan Tai Shan and others. My study of martial arts was interspersed with the study of traditional formulas for traumatology, including powders, wines, pastes, decoctions and pills, their applications, modifications and processing. Many martial artists are also known for their specialty in tui na, as basic exercises to develop the body in the tui na like Shaolin neigong (Internal training) or yi jin jing (Sinew Changing Classic) are part of the traditional martial arts. These exercises develop the limbs so that a martial artist trained in tui na can produce better results and a martial artist would probably know the body better than a non martial artist in movement and cause of injury.

In this article, I would like to introduce how to create a basic die da jiu (fall or strike wine) which can be used as a topical liniment for common contusions and bruises. Here is a list of herbs you will need:

Ru Xiang (Gummi Olibanum) 12 g

Mo Yao (Myrrh) 12 g

Chi Shao (Radix Paeoniae Rubra) 12 g

Mu Xiang (Radix Saussureae seu Vladimiriae) 12 g

Hong Hua (Flos Carthami Tinctorii) 9 g

Tao Ren (Semen Persicae) 9 g

Dang Gui Wei (Radix Angelicae Sinensis)12 g

Pu Huang (Pollen Typhae) 12 g

Da Huang Tan (Rhizoma Rhei - Charred) 9 g

Tian Qi (Radix Pseudoginseng) 12 g

Xue Ji (Sanguois Draconis) 9 g

Ding Xiang (Flos Caryophylli) 9 g

Those of you who know your Bensky Formulas, might recognize this Rx is very similar to qi li san (seven thousandths of a tael powder) from Liang fang ji ye (Small collection of fine Rx) or even the die da wan from Quan guo cheng yao chu fang ji (Collection of Country's Prepared Herbals) but addresses pain, blood movement and stop bleeding more. The measurements of the herbs is also different because this is more of an external use liniment. This Rx is fine for bruises, minor contusions, and sprains, but to make it a better Rx, we should modify the Rx according to our uses. For example, if there are broken bones, we should add Xu Duan (Radix Dipsaci Asperi), Wei Ling Xian (Radix Clematidis), and Tu Bie Chong (Eupolyphaga seu Opisthoplatia). If our focus is pain, add chuan xiong (Radix Ligustici), yan hu suo (Rhizoma Corydalis), yu jin (Curcumae), jiang huang (Rhozoma Curcumae Longae), ji xue teng (Radix et Caulis Jixueteng), san leng (Rhizoma Sparganii Stoloniferi) , mu tong (Caulis Mutong), di long (Lumbricus), su mu (Lignum Sappan), or wu ling zhi (Excrementum Trogopteri seu Pteromi) according to what your needs are. If there is pain in a certain area, we should add in Qiang Huo (Rhizoma et Radix Notopterygii) for the upper back, Du Huo (Radix Angelicae Pubecentis) for lower back, Bai Zhi (Radix Angelicae Dahuricae) for front of head, Tan Xiang (Lignum Sappan) for the chest, Niu Xi (Radix Achyrathis Bidentatae) to guide to the lower extremities, Xuan Fu Hua (Flos Inulae)to guide downwards, and Ma Huang (Herba Ephedrae) to guide upwards to the skin. We can even get more specific to use the guiding herbs enter particular channels by simply choosing herbs that go to that channel. For internal bleeding, add Di Yu (Radix Sanguisorbae Officinalis), Da Ji (Herba seu Radix Cirsii Japonici) and Xiao Ji (Herba Cephalanoploris). To make the Rx more fragrant to stop pain and open the orifices, add bing pian (Borneol) she xiang (Secret

Io Moschus Moschiferi) su he xiang (Styrax Liquidis), and to address wind, cold or damp Bi, you can also modify it with expel wind damp herbs, such as fang feng, gui zhi (Ramulus Cinnamoni) bai hua she (Agkistrodon seu Bungarus), hu gu (os tigris), lou shi teng (Caulis Trachelospermi Jasminoidis), hai feng teng (Caulis Piperis Futokadsurae), wu jia pi (Cortex Acanthopanacis Gracilistyli Radicis), and kuan jin teng (Flos Tussilaginis Farfarae). For more traumatic swellings, add Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae), Chuan Wu (Radix Aconiti Carmichaeli), Cao Wu ( Radix Aconiti Kusnezoffii) and Tian Nan Xing (Rhizoma Arisaematis).

I caution the person who is not knowledgeable in herbology to not put all the ingredients together to form one "super die da jiu"! I'm not sure what he or she would create! Look up the proper dosage of the herbs to use, and choose what you need and for what specific use in mind. Just for some background information, sometimes herbs are substituted for one another based on local availability and for financial reasons. Be wise in choosing what you need. For example, Hu Gu (Os tigris) may not be available because it is illegal. Wu Shao She (Zaocys Dhumnades) and Bai Hua She make fine substitutes (and no, you don't need both) and whichever is less expensive will work fine. Pregnant women should not touch or use this medicine.

All in all, one small Rx can turn into literally thousands of variations from one functional base of herbs in a Rx. When others boast their secret die da recipe is the original or more secret, they're simply blowing smoke and trying to say they're the best. It depends on what the function of the formula is for. I have a saying, "Let application be your guide; let function rule over form." It is applicable to medicine or martial arts.

You will also need a clean glass gallon bottle or jar and enough gin or vodka to fill a gallon. If you prefer a more traditional approach, of equal parts alcohol and water, you may use 50% spring water and 50% Everclear grain alcohol to make one gallon. Traditionally, mi jiu tou (rice wine head) is used - again, a gallon's worth, but the alcohol content is weaker than vodka or gin. One prepares the herbs by parching them through pan frying (no oil) in a wok or simply toasting all the herbs in a toaster oven to enhance the blood moving effect. No need to char them excessively, lest you lose all the active ingredients. Place the herbs in the container and pour the alcohol over the herbs. The alcohol used is always of a good drinking quality (ethyl alcohol), in cases where traumatic injury may be also internal. (Of course, if your die da jiu has poisonous ingredients, it would not do well to ingest it internally.) Beware of going the cheap route with isopropyl alcohol, you are simply making a poison batch of die da jiu. Traditionally, we never use isopropyl alcohol. Seal the container so that it is air tight and date and mark the bottle, and store in a dark place. Shake the bottle occasionally. In about 3 - 4 months, your die da jiu will be ready and will be superior to any on the market because you made it and you know specifically what you designed it for.

The herbal wine you created can be used simply by massaging it in to the affected area, or for use with tui na. You can also use the wine in the technique of fire cupping (hou guan), by placing a small amount in a cup, just enough to wet the bottom, spread it evenly and ignite it, then apply to the affected area. In doing this, I would caution that practice and common sense be your guide - lest you burn and scar your patient and have a nice liability lawsuit on your hands.

This is a brief introduction to die da shang ke and the common herbs used. In future articles, I will focus on plasters, pills, decoctions, their applications and modifications and how to create them.

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Making Superior
Dit Da Jow


by Lohon Larry Matheny
& Jung Shee Lacy



Finer Points of Making Superior Dit Da Jow

Lohon Shi Hing Larry Matheny is my oldest yearly tested student / elder brother Shi Fu within my 18 Daoist Palms System. Larry specializes in coconut breaking, iron body, weapons and the Tibetan Lama Burning Palm.

Larry is a long time postal worker and likes to hobby shoot with his vintage M1 Girand. Larry is a "cat" person like myself. Both of us share a deep interest in western, eastern and American Indian herbology.

I wrote a book in the Library of Congress entitled "Authentic Five Elder Martial Arts Formulas." Zev Rosenberg is head of the herbology department at San Diego’s Pacific College of Oriental Medicine. He is a licensed herbalist, acupunturist and Chinese medicine doctor. We met by being columnists for San Diego’s original alternative newspaper called "Wholistic Living News." I was honored to have had him assist me in the book’s creation, as well as a video we did concerning some of the formulas covered in our book.

Our first book was printed in collector item numbers of 60 and sold out through Ryukyu Distributor/Publishers. The original books sold for $125. Some good news is that the original book has been completely revamped and is better than ever. The new Revised Version will be sent to Ryukyu on CD-ROM to print unlimited copies, albeit I still have copyright. The new version was put together by myself and Lohon Shi Fu Andy Williams. It is around 100 pages and covers a half dozen or so formulas, broken down with weights and color photos.

Mew Hing Productions will market the book’s contents on CD-ROM along with a large database of ingredients with color photos. So far our database is over 400 ingredients. The CD-ROM version will contain about 30 formulas to start with. Video will show even more, to enhance the first in a series of CD-ROM’s.

You will see these and other products emerge on a regular basis via our website at www.ironpalm.com. Hear my over 50 major Martial Art Magazine articles read to you personally via streaming audio that does not require any plug-ins on your part. See video and animations, including the "string break" with a coconut and Lohon Henson demonstrating the bottom of two-coconut break.

In this column, I want to share the rest of the space by introducing you to a very advanced method of getting the most potency for your money from a package of dit da jow herbs. My student Lohon Matheny will now share this priceless information with you that took him time and patience to come across.

Increasing the Potency of Herbal Formulas

I’d like to pass on a technique I use to increase the potency of an herbal formula. It utilizes a basic principle of organic chemistry, which causes a more complete extraction of the herbal properties into the alcohol/water mixture (which is what vodka, sake, gin, etc. basically are.)

I give credit to my long time friend Nick Wayne, for this information. Nick is not an herbalist, but he does have a good science background (he also makes a great batch of home brew!) I’ve been using this technique for the last several years with excellent results. It’s a variation of what you are used to doing, however, the end result makes this extra effort well worth it.

About five years ago, Nick asked me to get him a good jow formula, which I did (I got him our all-purpose #4 formula.) Several months later, while visiting him at his residence, I asked Nick how his jow was coming. To my surprise, his finished product was darker and stronger than anything I’d made up to that point. I asked Nick how he was able to do this, and that’s when he told me of the method that I’m about to relate.

We all know how to make a jow or tonic:

1. Place the single herb or formula in a container.


2. Fill with the required amount of alcohol (vodka, sake, etc.)


3. Seal the container and set aside in a "proper place" to age (remembering to agitate the container once or twice per day during the aging period.) ("Proper place", here, is defined as a dark, "cool"/room temperature environment.)


This is the traditional way, or as I refer to it, the
"One Soak Method."

After you place the herbs in your container, fill with half the required amount of alcohol (i.e., if your goal is to make 1 gallon of jow or tonic, use half a gallon of alcohol; if you plan to make a half gallon, use 1 quart of alcohol, etc.).
From here, seal the container and treat it as usual. Let your formula age for 6 weeks. After this initial period, strain the liquid mixture off into a second container, seal and set it aside for the moment (in a proper place.) At this point, before I proceed further, I always re-seal the original container and tip it to one side, allowing whatever liquid remains, to collect. Two to three days later, I strain off this remaining liquid and add it to what I’ve put aside in that second container. This is your "First Soak."

"Two Soak Method"

You are now ready to begin "Part 2."
Take the original container and re-fill with the second half of your alcohol; re-seal and let this age for an extended period of time – the longer the better.

After the second aging period is complete, you strain off this "second soak" liquid and combine it with the "first soak" batch (which you set aside in that second container.)
Remember to repeat that step of tipping the container and collecting the remaining liquid, which you add to your finished bottle. Now seal your container or containers, store and use as needed.

So what’s going on?

I’m sure you’re well aware of the fact that some herbal properties are better extracted by water, others by alcohol. Substances like vodka and sake are an ideal medium for making herbal preparations. What you may not be aware of is the fact that some of the properties are more readily extracted than others. What this "Two Soak" method does is to first remove those more readily extracted properties (which is what that first six week period did), then those more difficult to remove properties are easier to get at. The second soaking, then, makes for a more complete removal of these more difficult to remove properties. The result is a more complete extraction of all the properties in your formula, and a more potent finished product.

I hope this information proves helpful and assists you in producing better herbal preparations.

Sincerely, Shi Fu (7 year) Shi Hing Larry Matheny;
Lohon, Ohio State Representative and System Secretary of Defense for Five Elder Monk Mew Hing’s 18 Daoist Palms System International.

In Closing:

For those of you needing herbal orders filled, visit our site at www.ironpalm.com for a list of over 20 formulas ready to fill. You must be 21 years old and call me personally at (619) 766-9256.

Enjoy!

-Jung Shee Lacy

Any questions or comments should be directed to:

Mew Hing Productions
42499 Old Highway 80
P.O. Box 427
Jacumba, CA 91934-0427 USA

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Five Photo Brand First Aid Antiseptic
-- --- -----

Alcohol (70% by volume)
Cattail (Pu Huang) Pollen Extract
Chinese Peony (chi shao) root extract
Dong quai (adang gui) root extract
Dragon's Blood Palm (xue jie) fruit extract
Frankincense (ru xiang) resin extract
Myrrh (mo yao) resin extract
Peppermint Oil
Safflower (hong hua) Flower Exract
Tienchi ginseng (san qi) root extract
Water

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The Smokestacks